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This Device On Hat Or Helmet Means U. S. Marines on Flickr.

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They Give Their Lives on Flickr.

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Our flags Beat Germany Support every flag that opposes Prussianism on Flickr.

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collegehumor:

Click to vote this up or down on uPick!

fuckyeahstufficareabout:

My top 6 favorite Red vs Blue characters in order:

  1. Sarge is by far my favorite. I love basically everything he says. I talk like him when I play shooter games.
  2. Church because he reminds me of myself sometimes, especially when he gets angry.
  3. Grif because he’s such a slacker.
  4. Washington because he’s badass and I can see myself doing the same things if I were in his position.
  5. Caboose because I think it’s obligatory for him to be a favorite character
  6. And Tex because she’s such a badass and her story still confuses the hell out of me.

themarvelageofcomics:

Here are both Jack Kirby’s uninked pencils and the final inked page by George Roussos (working under the pen name of George Bell) for a page from the Thor story in JOURNEY INTO MYSTERY #101.

At the bottom of the inked page, there’s a border note by Stan:

MINING ROBOT CAN MAKE ORE INTO POWDER

Well, I guess it’s bedtime.

wizardkellychallaficka:

My heart hurts and my hands will smell and taste of acetone for the next 2 days.

image

Nighty night, talk to you guys tomorrow Tumbl-bees ♥

ralphewig:

Human vs. Robotic Space Exploration - Yesterday I spent all day in SpaceX’ Mission Control room participating in ground communication checkouts for the upcoming flight of Dragon to the International Space Station. While we were working, we had a live video feed from the ISS on the wall showing Robonaut floating around the station. This got me thinking - will the future of space exploration be dominated by tele-presence robotics rather than flesh and bone astronauts?
The long lag-time for radio communications across the solar system puts a limit on the ability to control robots from Earth in real time; however, parking those fragile humans in orbit and letting them control more expendable robots on the surface of a new planet is seen by many as the safer-better-way of space exploration. Wired magazine has a good article summarizing both sides of the debate:

Teleoperation has been considered in the past for space exploration. During the Apollo era, the technology was not well developed but in the last decade, it has taken off. On Earth, surgeons in Baltimore now perform operations in Indonesia while officers in Nevada covertly spy on nuclear sites in Iran.Lester envisions a future where astronauts camp out on Mars’ moons Phobos and Deimos and order remote-controlled robots to drive long distances over the planet’s surface, set up geologic instruments, and collect samples for analysis.

ralphewig:

Human vs. Robotic Space Exploration - Yesterday I spent all day in SpaceX’ Mission Control room participating in ground communication checkouts for the upcoming flight of Dragon to the International Space Station. While we were working, we had a live video feed from the ISS on the wall showing Robonaut floating around the station. This got me thinking - will the future of space exploration be dominated by tele-presence robotics rather than flesh and bone astronauts?

The long lag-time for radio communications across the solar system puts a limit on the ability to control robots from Earth in real time; however, parking those fragile humans in orbit and letting them control more expendable robots on the surface of a new planet is seen by many as the safer-better-way of space exploration. Wired magazine has a good article summarizing both sides of the debate:

Teleoperation has been considered in the past for space exploration. During the Apollo era, the technology was not well developed but in the last decade, it has taken off. On Earth, surgeons in Baltimore now perform operations in Indonesia while officers in Nevada covertly spy on nuclear sites in Iran.

Lester envisions a future where astronauts camp out on Mars’ moons Phobos and Deimos and order remote-controlled robots to drive long distances over the planet’s surface, set up geologic instruments, and collect samples for analysis.

futurist-foresight:

Last night was the much anticipated announcement of Planetary Resources. See more about it in these posts about Planetary Resources and watch the full announcement here.

The plan is very ambitious and fraught with risk but the potential return is enormous.

futurescope:

Asteroid Mining

The Press Conference is over and The Associated Press reports:

Space-faring robots could be extracting gold and platinum from asteroids within 10 years if a new venture backed by two Silicon Valley titans and filmmaker James Cameron gets off the ground as planned.

Outside experts are skeptical about the project because it would probably require untold millions or perhaps billions of dollars and huge advances in technology. But the same entrepreneurs pioneered the selling of space rides to tourists — a notion that seemed fanciful not long ago, too.

“Since my early teenage years, I’ve wanted to be an asteroid miner. I always viewed it as a glamorous vision of where we could go,” Peter Diamandis, one of the founders of Planetary Resources, told a news conference Tuesday at the Museum of Flight in Seattle. The company’s vision “is to make the resources of space available to humanity.”

The inaugural step, to be achieved in the next 18 to 24 months, would be launching the first in a series of private telescopes that would search for the right type of asteroids.

The plan is to use commercially built robotic ships to squeeze rocket fuel and valuable minerals out of the rocks that routinely whiz by Earth. Company leaders predict they could have their version of a space-based gas station up and running by 2020. […]

[read more] [Planetary Resources] [NASA 2016 asteroid sampling mission] [BigThink Interview with Diamandis]

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